Spring Java Ide

The IDE provides built-in support for Spring Framework 4.x and 3.x. Framework libraries are packaged with the IDE and are automatically added to the project classpath when the framework is selected. Configuration settings are provided, such as naming and mapping of the Spring Web MVC DispatcherServlet. Blogs » Use Vim as a Java IDE. This tutorial introduces you to SpaceVim as a Java environment, by using the lang#java layer, you make SpaceVim into a great lightweight Java IDE. Each of the following sections will be covered: Enable language layer. The package goal will compile your Java code, run any tests, and finish by packaging the code up in a JAR file within the target directory. The name of the JAR file will be based on the project’s and.For example, given the minimal pom.xml file from. Alternatively, if you use an Integrated Development Environment (IDE) like Borland JBuilder, Eclipse, IntelliJ IDEA, or Sun ONE Studio, you will have to compile and run a simple program to confirm that the IDE knows where you have installed Java. Otherwise, you will have to carry out a proper setup as given in the document of the IDE. You should definitely use SpringSource Tool Suite, an Eclipse-based IDE created by SpringSource themselves. Also on the official SpringSource channel @YouTube you'll find a pretty extensive 5-part introduction to using Spring & STS.

  • Spring Core Basics
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  • Spring Useful Resources
  • Selected Reading

So far you have seen how we configure Spring beans using XML configuration file. If you are comfortable with XML configuration, then it is really not required to learn how to proceed with Java-based configuration as you are going to achieve the same result using either of the configurations available.

Java-based configuration option enables you to write most of your Spring configuration without XML but with the help of few Java-based annotations explained in this chapter.

@Configuration & @Bean Annotations

Annotating a class with the @Configuration indicates that the class can be used by the Spring IoC container as a source of bean definitions. The @Bean annotation tells Spring that a method annotated with @Bean will return an object that should be registered as a bean in the Spring application context. The simplest possible @Configuration class would be as follows −

The above code will be equivalent to the following XML configuration −

Here, the method name is annotated with @Bean works as bean ID and it creates and returns the actual bean. Your configuration class can have a declaration for more than one @Bean. Once your configuration classes are defined, you can load and provide them to Spring container using AnnotationConfigApplicationContext as follows −

Java

You can load various configuration classes as follows −

Example

Let us have a working Eclipse IDE in place and take the following steps to create a Spring application −

StepsDescription
1Create a project with a name SpringExample and create a package com.tutorialspoint under the src folder in the created project.
2Add required Spring libraries using Add External JARs option as explained in the Spring Hello World Example chapter.
3Because you are using Java-based annotations, so you also need to add CGLIB.jar from your Java installation directory and ASM.jar library which can be downloaded from asm.ow2.org.
4Create Java classes HelloWorldConfig, HelloWorld and MainApp under the com.tutorialspoint package.
5The final step is to create the content of all the Java files and Bean Configuration file and run the application as explained below.

Here is the content of HelloWorldConfig.java file

Here is the content of HelloWorld.java file

Following is the content of the MainApp.java file

Once you are done creating all the source files and adding the required additional libraries, let us run the application. You should note that there is no configuration file required. If everything is fine with your application, it will print the following message −

Injecting Bean Dependencies

When @Beans have dependencies on one another, expressing that the dependency is as simple as having one bean method calling another as follows −

Here, the foo bean receives a reference to bar via the constructor injection. Now let us look at another working example.

Example

Let us have a working Eclipse IDE in place and take the following steps to create a Spring application −

StepsDescription
1Create a project with a name SpringExample and create a package com.tutorialspoint under the src folder in the created project.
2Add required Spring libraries using Add External JARs option as explained in the Spring Hello World Example chapter.
3Because you are using Java-based annotations, so you also need to add CGLIB.jar from your Java installation directory and ASM.jar library which can be downloaded from asm.ow2.org.
4Create Java classes TextEditorConfig, TextEditor, SpellChecker and MainApp under the com.tutorialspoint package.
5The final step is to create the content of all the Java files and Bean Configuration file and run the application as explained below.

Here is the content of TextEditorConfig.java file

Here is the content of TextEditor.java file

Following is the content of another dependent class file SpellChecker.java

Following is the content of the MainApp.java file

Java

Once you are done creating all the source files and adding the required additional libraries, let us run the application. You should note that there is no configuration file required. If everything is fine with your application, it will print the following message −

The @Import Annotation

The @Import annotation allows for loading @Bean definitions from another configuration class. Consider a ConfigA class as follows −

You can import above Bean declaration in another Bean Declaration as follows −

Now, rather than needing to specify both ConfigA.class and ConfigB.class when instantiating the context, only ConfigB needs to be supplied as follows −

Java spring project ideas

Lifecycle Callbacks

The @Bean annotation supports specifying arbitrary initialization and destruction callback methods, much like Spring XML's init-method and destroy-method attributes on the bean element −

Specifying Bean Scope

The default scope is singleton, but you can override this with the @Scope annotation as follows −

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